ORLANDO, FL – Karen Croake Heisler was very outspoken on her disdain for people who chose to not receive the COVID-19 vaccination. The 67-year-old former Notre Dame professor was vocal on her Twitter account over how she had no “tolerance” for the unvaccinated and unmasked.

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She posted after receiving her first Pfizer shot in January, “Just got my first dose of the vaccine. Never been happier to be ‘old.’ Now let’s get these vaccines rolling for everyone!”

In April, she commented on another person’s post that she had no “problems with second Pfizer shot except a sore arm.”

“Just received my third Covid vaccine,” she tweeted on September 7.

Then, on September 14, this: “Welcome to the reality of the Covid crisis in Florida. My cardiologist tried to admit me to the hospital but there are no rooms because of Covid. Had to go ER route. Place is a teaming and the waiting room stretches into hallways. Wait for some is 15 hours. Get the damn vaccine.”

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Later that same day, she said, “So still waiting to see a doc although they have run tests. Still no room in hospital or in ER bay. PA announcement just said ER could not accept more patients. This is a BIG hospital. Damn the unvaccinated. They have made life hell for a lot of people.”

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Another week after that, she was dead.

Of course, her obituary said she died from “cancer-related complications.”

While her death is sad, it’s even more sad that she spent her life hating people for making a decision about their own body that didn’t effect her at all. Her obituary didn’t say what kind of cancer she reportedly had, but she did inject an experimental drug into her body, thrice, when she was immuno-compromised.

With her death comes at least a little more data on what the COVID-19 vaccination does to a person with cancer.