Beating off a recall election, California Governor Gavin Newsom hasn’t let up when it comes to his leadership and COVID-19. Just after he retained his position in office, Newsom declared that all students must get the COVID-19 vaccine in order to attend school. This also includes private schools as well. And while parents go on the defense, protecting the rights of themselves and their children, the Governor once again made headlines yesterday when he announced that all California high school students will be required to pass a course of “ethnic studies”, meaning Critical Race Theory. 

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Signing the bill on Friday, Newsom made California the first state in the country that would require all public high school students to pass at least one course in Critical Race Theory.  

But while the Democrats might be celebrating, it should be noted that according to ABC7, the bill will not take effect until 2029. “The new law requires all public schools in the state to offer at least one ethnic studies course starting in the 2025-26 school year and requires students graduating in the 2029-30 school year to have completed a one-semester course in the subject.”

Although 8 years is a great deal of time, the person behind the critical race theory legislation, Assemblyman Jose Medina, said, “It’s been a long wait. I think schools are ready now to make curriculum that is more equitable and more reflective of social justice.”

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Discussing the time it will take to incorporate the curriculum, Medina noted, “Schools can’t just flip the switch and be ready. This gives school districts plenty of time to get their curriculum in place and hire well-qualified teachers to teach these classes.”

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As for what will be taught, ABC7 reported,  “The model curriculum focuses on four historically marginalized groups that are central to college-level ethnic studies: African Americans, Chicanos, and other Latinos, Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders and Native Americans.”