A recent piece from none other than the Wall Street Journal was titled with a simple, but relevant, question: “Who Rigged the Census?”

As reported in the National Review, a number of Republican stronghold states were seemingly undercounted, which potentially cost some red states additional seats in the House based on legitimate population sizes.

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If that weren’t damaging enough, apparently some Democratic strongholds managed to benefit from being overcounted.

Coming from the Wall Street Journal’s Editorial Board, the piece makes mention of “how Democrats accused the Trump Administration of trying to rig the 2020 Census,” yet, the findings from a Census Bureau study revealed that Republican states may have bore the brunt of some mistaken population counts.

Not exactly a scenario seething with potential Republican meddling.

Reportedly 14 states were either significantly overcounted or undercounted. The states suffering significant undercounting are as follows:

  • Arkansas (5%)
  • Tennessee (4.8%)
  • Mississippi (4.1%)
  • Florida (3.5%)
  • Illinois (2%)
  • Texas (1.9%)

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For the sake of context, Arkansas, Tennessee, Mississippi, and Texas are considered safely red states, with Florida increasingly becoming more Republican (as Trump won the state in 2020 as well as Ron DeSantis being elected governor in 2019). And these undercounted populations may have caused some serious damage.

According to the report from the Wall Street Journal, the states of Texas and Florida potentially lost an additional seat in the House from being undercounted.

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As for the states that endured significant overcounting, they are as follows:

  • Hawaii (6.8%)
  • Delaware (5.5%),
  • Rhode Island (5.1%)
  • Minnesota (3.8%)
  • New York (3.4%)
  • Utah (2.6%)
  • Massachusetts (2.2%)
  • Ohio (1.5%)

Of all the aforementioned states that were beneficiaries of overcounting, the only Republican states in the mix are Ohio and Utah. And with New York being overcounted by approximately 695,000 people, the state may have actually lost a seat in the House if the population were accurately accounted for.

These are obviously some large-scale screw ups.

So, one might be asking themselves what the Census Bureau claims is the culprit in these massive over and undercounting conundrums. Well, it would hardly come as a shock to most that the Census Bureau laid it on the easiest excuse to render over the past couple of years: the pandemic.

And while some things can be reasonably attributed to the pandemic and general response to COVID back in 2020 and beyond, it is a bit of a head scratcher as to how a pandemic muddled officials’ ability to count.

But here’s the real kicker – according to the Wall Street Journal, Democrats actually sued to get extra time to conduct the 2020 census, thereby extending it into the Biden administration.

“But recall that progressives in autumn 2020 sued to kick the reapportionment into the Biden Administration. By law the Census was supposed to be complete by Dec. 31. Yet Democrats claimed that bureaucrats needed more time to do post-survey accuracy checks. They got their way. Whatever accuracy checks the bureau used, they evidently failed.”

So, Democrats slung their weight around to get extra time to count people, got it granted, and then still managed to screw the pooch while adversely harming Republican states in the process. At this point, yeah, it’s fair to ask who rigged the census.

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